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This post is an excerpt from the QnA discussion of Richard Fyenman’s talk.

[Question] You ask me, if an ordinary person by studying
hard would get to be able to imagine these things like Fyenman can imagine?

[Richard Feynman’s Ans:] Of course! I was an ordinary person who studied hard!
There’s no miracle people, it just happens they got interested in
this thing and they learned all this stuff, they’re just people, there’s no
talent – a special miracle ability
to understand quantum mechanics or a
miracle ability to imagine electromagnetic fields
that comes without practicing and reading and learning and study.

So, if you say you take an ordinary person who’s willing to
devote a great deal of time and study and work and thinking and mathematics –
It’s just a matter of time right – then he’s become a scientist.

Video to the point
Ref – [55:00] https://youtu.be/P1ww1IXRfTA?t=3301



Richard Phillips Feynman, (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist, known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965 jointly with Julian Schwinger and Shin’ichirō Tomonaga. People often consider him as the Father of Nano Technology.

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